What should be our response as a student if there is

A) A Natural Disaster in your school (example Earthquake)

B) A terrorist attack on your school.

C) An incident of Fire in your school.


Can you please help me in this question with 4 points for each.

Dear student,

Here is the answer:

What should be our response as a student if there is

A) A Natural Disaster in your school (example Earthquake)
  • When there is a quake one should not panic.
  • The students should take shelter under the desk immediately.
  • When the quake is over the students should walk in a line and out of the enclosed area.
  • The students should stringently follow teacher's instructions.

B) A terrorist attack on your school.
  • If there is a terrorist attack the students should not panic.
  • They should follow teacher's instructions.
  • If told to leave they should leave the premises immediately.
  • Security of the fellow students and one's own should be on priority.

C) An incident of Fire in your school.
  • When there is a fire in school one should not panic.
  • Use stairs to move out of the school
  • Use fire extinguisher to extinguish the fire.
  • Save yourself and others

Regards

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Students, faculty and administrators can prepare themselves for emergencies at school in a number of ways, from conducting regular, emergency-specific drills to making sure the building?s infrastructure is up to code. When emergencies do happen, schools need to know how to respond appropriately and recover as quickly and effectively as possible.

Earthquakes at School

Many natural disasters can be predicted and tracked, but earthquakes tend to strike without warning. While smaller quakes might not have much impact on a school, it?s important to take precautionary measures in case a large earthquake happens. Search Programs

Emergency Preparedness in School

June 16, 2021?| Staff Writers

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How to prevent, prepare, respond and recover in the face of emergencies and disasters

Natural disasters and other emergencies can happen at any time, and when they happen at school, everyone should be prepared to handle them safely and effectively. Administrators, teachers, staff, parents and students can work together to promote and maintain school-wide safety and minimize the effects of emergencies and other dangerous situations. This guide covers different ways everyone in the school community can prepare for various natural disasters and other emergencies to stay safe.

Is Your School at Risk? A Look at Natural Disasters

Some natural disasters can be predicted, giving schools enough warning to evacuate or take other safety precautions, but others can happen unexpectedly or go through rapid changes that suddenly put a school in danger. The first step schools should take in preparing for these types of emergencies is to assess the natural disaster risks in their areas. The map below can help schools determine their likelihood of being affected by natural disasters like these:

Winter storms & extreme cold

Extreme heat

Wildfires

House & building fires

Thunderstorms & lightning

Landslides & debris flow

Natural Disaster Risk Map

[Map]

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School Emergency Preparedness:
Natural Disasters & Other Emergencies

Students, faculty and administrators can prepare themselves for emergencies at school in a number of ways, from conducting regular, emergency-specific drills to making sure the building?s infrastructure is up to code. When emergencies do happen, schools need to know how to respond appropriately and recover as quickly and effectively as possible.

Earthquakes at School

Many natural disasters can be predicted and tracked, but earthquakes tend to strike without warning. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, 17 major earthquakes (7.0+ magnitude) and one great earthquake (8.0+ magnitude) are expected to occur in any given year along with millions of small earthquakes worldwide. While smaller quakes might not have much impact on a school, it?s important to take precautionary measures in case a large earthquake happens.

Getting Your School Prepared

Thoughtful planning and preparation can help ensure the safety of students and staff should and earthquake occur during school hours. These tips can aid in the preparation process.

Consider the buildings.
Schools are built to code at the time of their construction, and many older school buildings might not meet earthquake protection standards. Seek out an architect to evaluate the building and point out areas that could be reinforced.

Secure furniture.
Any tall shelving, audio-visual equipment and heavy computer cabinets should be secured to the wall. Try to avoid placing heavy objects on shelves or other surfaces where they might fall during severe shaking.

Create a cache of emergency supplies.
In a serious earthquake, it could be awhile before it?s safe for students and staff to leave the building. Have a plan to shelter in place for two or three days, including plenty of emergency food, water and first aid kits.

Drop, cover and hold on.
Make sure students are familiar with safety procedures, like taking cover under their desks until the quake subsides. Have a class discussion on earthquake preparedness at the beginning of each school year.

Hold earthquake drills.
This is necessary to ensure an immediate and proper response. Earthquake drills also help administrators figure out where the process needs to be reevaluated.

Practice evacuation plans.
Aftershocks are very likely. Solid evacuation plans should get students out of the building within minutes and offer a safe meeting place for all classes.

Be prepared for search and rescue.
In addition to earthquake drills and evacuation procedures, staff may need to conduct search and rescues. However, before entering the building, staff should make sure that they aren?t going to put themselves in danger. If one or more outer walls or the roof is collapsed, or if the building is leaning, staff should wait for search and rescue professionals.
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Getting Your School Prepared for earthquake:

Thoughtful planning and preparation can help ensure the safety of students and staff should and earthquake occur during school hours. These tips can aid in the preparation process.

Consider the buildings.
Schools are built to code at the time of their construction, and many older school buildings might not meet earthquake protection standards. Seek out an architect to evaluate the building and point out areas that could be reinforced.

Secure furniture.
Any tall shelving, audio-visual equipment and heavy computer cabinets should be secured to the wall. Try to avoid placing heavy objects on shelves or other surfaces where they might fall during severe shaking.

Create a cache of emergency supplies.
In a serious earthquake, it could be awhile before it?s safe for students and staff to leave the building. Have a plan to shelter in place for two or three days, including plenty of emergency food, water and first aid kits.

Drop, cover and hold on.
Make sure students are familiar with safety procedures, like taking cover under their desks until the quake subsides. Have a class discussion on earthquake preparedness at the beginning of each school year.

Hold earthquake drills.
This is necessary to ensure an immediate and proper response. Earthquake drills also help administrators figure out where the process needs to be reevaluated.

Practice evacuation plans.
Aftershocks are very likely. Solid evacuation plans should get students out of the building within minutes and offer a safe meeting place for all classes.

Be prepared for search and rescue.
In addition to earthquake drills and evacuation procedures, staff may need to conduct search and rescues. However, before entering the building, staff should make sure that they aren?t going to put themselves in danger. If one or more outer walls or the roof is collapsed, or if the building is leaning, staff should wait for search and rescue professionals.
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